Change blindness

@article{Simons1997ChangeB,
  title={Change blindness},
  author={D. Simons and D. Levin},
  journal={Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  year={1997},
  volume={1},
  pages={261-267}
}
Although at any instant we experience a rich, detailed visual world, we do not use such visual details to form a stable representation across views. Over the past five years, researchers have focused increasingly on 'change blindness' (the inability to detect changes to an object or scene) as a means to examine the nature of our representations. Experiments using a diverse range of methods and displays have produced strikingly similar results: unless a change to a visual scene produces a… Expand
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