Chancery and the Emergence of Standard Written English in the Fifteenth Century

@article{Fisher1977ChanceryAT,
  title={Chancery and the Emergence of Standard Written English in the Fifteenth Century},
  author={J. H. Fisher},
  journal={Speculum},
  year={1977},
  volume={52},
  pages={870 - 899}
}
THERE has been some discussion of late among descriptive linguists and socio-linguists as to the nature of "standard" English, the one tending to deny the existence of a standard, because of variations in the spoken language, and the other arguing that the standard language is an elitist shibboleth erected to perpetuate the authority of the dominant culture.' Neither of these positions recognizes the historical fact that in every society there is a formal, official language in which business is… Expand

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