Chance caught on the wing: cis-regulatory evolution and the origin of pigment patterns in Drosophila

@article{Gompel2005ChanceCO,
  title={Chance caught on the wing: cis-regulatory evolution and the origin of pigment patterns in Drosophila},
  author={Nicolas Gompel and Benjamin Prud’homme and Patricia J. Wittkopp and Victoria A. Kassner and Sean B. Carroll},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={433},
  pages={481-487}
}
The gain, loss or modification of morphological traits is generally associated with changes in gene regulation during development. However, the molecular bases underlying these evolutionary changes have remained elusive. Here we identify one of the molecular mechanisms that contributes to the evolutionary gain of a male-specific wing pigmentation spot in Drosophila biarmipes, a species closely related to Drosophila melanogaster. We show that the evolution of this spot involved modifications of… 

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    Development, growth & differentiation
  • 2020
TLDR
The process of wing formation in Drosophila, the general mechanism of pigmentation formation, and the transport of substances necessary for pigmentation, including melanin precursors, through wing veins are summarized here.
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