Challenging Professions: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Women’s Professional Work

@article{Smyth2002ChallengingPH,
  title={Challenging Professions: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Women’s Professional Work},
  author={Elizabeth M. Smyth and S. Acker and P. Bourne and A. Prentice and C. Toman},
  journal={Nursing History Review},
  year={2002},
  volume={10},
  pages={209 - 210}
}
"Challenging Professions" is an innovative, interdisciplinary collection of 13 thematically linked yet methodologically diverse essays that explore Canadian women's engagement with professional education and employment in the 20th century. Guided by a co-authored introduction, this collection critically examines how women's entry into and continued participation in the professions not only contested but also challenged a concept of professionalism that was and remains profoundly gendered. The… Expand
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