Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety

@article{Panda2013ChallengesIT,
  title={Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety},
  author={Rakhi Panda and H Ariyarathna and Plaimein Amnuaycheewa and Afua O Tetteh and Siddanakoppalu N. Pramod and S. L. Taylor and Barbara K. Ballmer-Weber and Richard E. Goodman},
  journal={Allergy},
  year={2013},
  volume={68},
  pages={142 - 151}
}
Premarket, genetically modified (GM) plants are assessed for potential risks of food allergy. The major risk would be transfer of a gene encoding an allergen or protein nearly identical to an allergen into a different food source, which can be assessed by specific serum testing. The potential that a newly expressed protein might become an allergen is evaluated based on resistance to digestion in pepsin and abundance in food fractions. If the modified plant is a common allergenic source (e.g… 
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  • 2013
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The results indicate that, in general, CP4-EPSPS-transfected GM soybeans are not more allergenic than non-GM soybeans.
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