Cervical Spine Joint Hypermobility: A Possible Predisposing Factor for New Daily Persistent Headache

@article{Rozen2006CervicalSJ,
  title={Cervical Spine Joint Hypermobility: A Possible Predisposing Factor for New Daily Persistent Headache},
  author={TD Rozen and JM Roth and N Denenberg},
  journal={Cephalalgia},
  year={2006},
  volume={26},
  pages={1182 - 1185}
}
The objective of this study was to suggest that joint hypermobility (specifically of the cervical spine) is a predisposing factor for the development of new daily persistent headache (NDPH). Twelve individuals (10 female, 2 male) with primary NDPH were evaluated by one of two physical therapists. Each patient was tested for active cervical range of motion and for the presence of excessive intersegmental vertebral motion in the cervical spine. All patients were screened utilizing the Beighton… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
A practical classification of pain presentations and factors contributing in generating painful sensations in JHS/EDS‐HT is proposed and a set of lifestyle recommendations to instruct patients as well as specific investigations aimed at characterizing pain and fatigue are identified.
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TLDR
CROM screening is warranted for patients identified with GJH and for rehabilitation goal-setting and the sagittal cervical hypermobile range in both genders across the lifespan is established.
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TLDR
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Defi nitions of Joint Hypermobility and Joint Hypermobility Syndrome
Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) was initially defi ned as the occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the presence of joint laxity and hypermobility in otherwise healthy individuals. It is now
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