Certified Everlasting Functional Encryption

@article{Hiroka2022CertifiedEF,
  title={Certified Everlasting Functional Encryption},
  author={Taiga Hiroka and Tomoyuki Morimae and Ryo Nishimaki and Takashi Yamakawa},
  journal={IACR Cryptol. ePrint Arch.},
  year={2022},
  volume={2022},
  pages={969}
}
Computational security in cryptography has a risk that computational assumptions underlying the security are broken in the future. One solution is to construct information-theoretically-secure protocols, but many cryptographic primitives are known to be impossible (or unlikely) to have information-theoretical security even in the quantum world. A nice compromise (intrinsic to quantum) is certified everlasting security, which roughly means the following. A receiver with possession of quantum… 
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