Cerebral activation during hypnotically induced and imagined pain

@article{Derbyshire2004CerebralAD,
  title={Cerebral activation during hypnotically induced and imagined pain},
  author={Stuart W. G. Derbyshire and Matthew Whalley and V. Andrew Stenger and David A. Oakley},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2004},
  volume={23},
  pages={392-401}
}
The continuing absence of an identifiable physical cause for disorders such as chronic low back pain, atypical facial pain, or fibromyalgia, is a source of ongoing controversy and frustration among pain physicians and researchers. Aberrant cerebral activity is widely believed to be involved in such disorders, but formal demonstration of the brain independently generating painful experiences is lacking. Here we identify brain areas directly involved in the generation of pain using hypnotic… 
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