Cerebellar tumour presenting with pathological laughter and gelastic syncope

@article{Famularo2007CerebellarTP,
  title={Cerebellar tumour presenting with pathological laughter and gelastic syncope},
  author={Giuseppe Famularo and F M Corsi and Giovanni Minisola and Claudio De Simone and Giulio Cesare Nicotra},
  journal={European Journal of Neurology},
  year={2007},
  volume={14}
}
There is no report of patients in whom pathological laughter, a rare condition characterized by uncontrollable episodes of laughter usually triggered by unrelated stimuli, was ever closely associated with a loss of consciousness overtly linked with the onset of such uncontrollable laughter, also referred to as a gelastic syncope. A 53‐year‐old man presented with a 4‐month history of syncope following intense and uncoordinated laughter. Physical and neurological examination was normal and the… Expand
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