Cerebellar-induced apraxic agraphia: A review and three new cases

@article{Smet2011CerebellarinducedAA,
  title={Cerebellar-induced apraxic agraphia: A review and three new cases},
  author={Hyo Jung de Smet and Sebastiaan Engelborghs and Philippe Paquier and Peter Paul De Deyn and Peter Mari{\"e}n},
  journal={Brain and Cognition},
  year={2011},
  volume={76},
  pages={424-434}
}
Apraxic agraphia is a writing disorder due to a loss or lack of access to motor engrams that program the movements necessary to produce letters. Clinical and functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that the neural network responsible for writing includes the superior parietal region and the dorsolateral and medial premotor cortex. Recent studies of two cases with atypical lesion localisations in the left thalamus and the right cerebellum support the hypothesis that the written… Expand
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Apraxic agraphia follows disruption of skilled movement plans of writing and is characterized by distorted, hesitant, incomplete, and imprecise letter formation. The causative lesion is located inExpand
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