Cephalopod chromatophores: neurobiology and natural history

@article{Messenger2001CephalopodCN,
  title={Cephalopod chromatophores: neurobiology and natural history},
  author={John B. Messenger},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={2001},
  volume={76}
}
  • J. Messenger
  • Published 1 November 2001
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Biological Reviews
The chromatophores of cephalopods differ fundamentally from those of other animals: they are neuromuscular organs rather than cells and are not controlled hormonally. They constitute a unique motor system that operates upon the environment without applying any force to it. Each chromatophore organ comprises an elastic sacculus containing pigment, to which is attached a set of obliquely striated radial muscles, each with its nerves and glia. When excited the muscles contract, expanding the… Expand
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TLDR
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