Central venous catheter replacement strategies: a systematic review of the literature.

@article{Cook1997CentralVC,
  title={Central venous catheter replacement strategies: a systematic review of the literature.},
  author={Deborah J. Cook and Adrienne G. Randolph and Philip Kernerman and Cynthia M. Cupido and Derek King and Chuck Soukup and Christian Brun-Buisson},
  journal={Critical care medicine},
  year={1997},
  volume={25 8},
  pages={
          1417-24
        }
}
OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of guidewire exchange and new-site replacement strategies on the frequency of catheter colonization and infection, catheter-related bacteremia, and mechanical complications in critically ill patients. [] Key MethodDATA SOURCES We searched for published and unpublished research by means of MEDLINE and Science Citation Index, manual searching of Index Medicus, citation review of relevant primary and review articles, review of personal files, and contact with primary…
Prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections.
  • L. Mermel
  • Medicine, Biology
    Annals of internal medicine
  • 2000
TLDR
Simple interventions can reduce the risk for serious catheter-related infection and use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine-impregnated or minocycline-rifampin-impraped short-term central venous catheters if the rate of infection is high despite adherence to other strategies that do not incorporate antimicrobial agents.
Applying the science to the prevention of catheter-related infections.
TLDR
The recommended prevention strategies with strong supportive evidence include educating and training of health care providers who insert and maintain catheters; using full barrier precautions during central venous catheter insertion; using a 2% chlorhexidine preparation for skin antisepsis; and using antiseptic/antibiotic impregnated short-term central ven Mousses.
Guidelines for the prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections.
TLDR
The recommended preventive strategies with the strongest supportive evidence are education and training of healthcare providers who insert and maintain catheters; maximal sterile barrier precautions during central venous catheter insertion and use of a 2% chlorhexidine preparation for skin antisepsis.
Central venous catheter care for the patient with cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline.
  • C. Schiffer, P. Mangu, M. Levine
  • Medicine
    Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • 2013
PURPOSE To develop an evidence-based guideline on central venous catheter (CVC) care for patients with cancer that addresses catheter type, insertion site, and placement as well as prophylaxis and
Guidelines for the prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections.
TLDR
The recommended preventive strategies with the strongest supportive evidence are education and training of healthcare providers who insert and maintain catheters, and maximal sterile barrier precautions during central venous catheter insertion, which can reduce the risk for serious catheter-related infection.
Can We Achieve Consensus on Central Venous Catheter-Related Infections?
TLDR
A new and more rigorous classification with criteria for definite, probable and possible catheter-related bacteraemia is proposed and it is hoped that this classification will enhance the interpretation of the literature and the planning of new investigations.
Interventions for restoring patency of occluded central venous catheter lumens.
TLDR
There was low quality evidence from a meta-analysis of two studies suggesting that urokinase was more effective than placebo for restoring patency to occluded CVC lumens in adults and children with underlying medical conditions, and insufficient evidence to draw conclusions on the safety of uro Kinase.
Interventions for restoring patency of occluded central venous catheter lumens (Review).
TLDR
Assessment of the efficacy and safety of different interventions used to restore patency of occluded CVC lumens, in adults and children found insufficient evidence to draw conclusions on the safety of urokinase.
Central venous catheter replacement in the ICU: new site versus guidewire exchange.
TLDR
Prolonged indwelling time is a significant risk factor for catheter-related infections; the second episode of cannulation and guidewire exchange did not present significant risk factors forCatheter- related infections.
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TLDR
It is concluded that changing a central venous catheter over a guidewire is as safe and has better patient acceptability than inserting a new one, as the proven CRS rate is low (2%) despite a high (27%) suspected rate.
Safety of a guidewire technique for replacement of pulmonary artery catheters.
Prospective study of catheter replacement and other risk factors for infection of hyperalimentation catheters.
TLDR
To determine risk factors for infection of hyperalimentation catheters, prospectively studied 169 catheter systems by using a semiquantitative culture technique and estimated the risk of infection per day to be 1.3 times greater for a catheter if the patient had been hospitalized 50 days instead of seven days, and 3.8 times greater if the customer had a Swan-Ganz catheter at the time of insertion.
Catheter Infection: A Comparison of Two Catheter Maintenance Techniques
TLDR
Study results indicate no significant difference in infection or colonization rates Between the two methods of catheter replacement.
Infectious and mechanical complications of central venous catheters placed by percutaneous venipuncture and over guidewires
TLDR
When prolonged central venous or pulmonary artery catheterization is necessary, periodic catheter replacement over a guidewire is associated with fewer mechanical complications than initial venipuncture and is also associated with no increase in risk of infection.
Prospective comparison of two management strategies of central venous catheters in burn patients.
TLDR
Changing the CVC using the wire guide technique did not prevent, nor predict, CVC bacterial contamination, and there was no difference in the incidence of CVC sepsis between the two groups studied.
Catheter‐related sepsis in patients on intravenous nutrition: A prospective study of quantitative catheter cultures and guidewire changes for suspected sepsis
TLDR
Replacement of catheters over a guidewire is a safe and convenient way of establishing whether sepsis is catheter‐related, and because organisms may be transferred, the procedure is not an appropriate treatment for catheter-related sepsi.
Pulmonary artery catheterization: a prospective study of internal jugular and subclavian approaches.
TLDR
Using a standard, sterile-insertion technique and a catheter-maintenance protocol yielded a low risk of insertion and infectious complications at either the IJ or SC site, indicating that PACs can be changed safely over a guidewire at 72 h, avoiding further insertion risks without increasing infectious complications.
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