Central cancellation of self-produced tickle sensation

@article{Blakemore1998CentralCO,
  title={Central cancellation of self-produced tickle sensation},
  author={S. J. Blakemore and Daniel M. Wolpert and Chris D. Frith},
  journal={Nature Neuroscience},
  year={1998},
  volume={1},
  pages={635-640}
}
A self-produced tactile stimulus is perceived as less ticklish than the same stimulus generated externally. We used fMRI to examine neural responses when subjects experienced a tactile stimulus that was either self-produced or externally produced. More activity was found in somatosensory cortex when the stimulus was externally produced. In the cerebellum, less activity was associated with a movement that generated a tactile stimulus than with a movement that did not. This difference suggests… Expand
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