Central and peripheral contributions to muscle fatigue in humans during sustained maximal effort

@article{KentBraun1999CentralAP,
  title={Central and peripheral contributions to muscle fatigue in humans during sustained maximal effort},
  author={Jane A. Kent‐Braun},
  journal={European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology},
  year={1999},
  volume={80},
  pages={57-63}
}
  • J. Kent‐Braun
  • Published 1 June 1999
  • Biology
  • European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
Abstract The purpose of this study was to estimate the relative contributions of central and peripheral factors to the development of human muscle fatigue. Nine healthy subjects [five male, four female; age = 30 (2) years, mean (SE)] sustained a maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) of the ankle dorsiflexor muscles for 4 min. Fatigue was quantitated as the fall in MVC. Three measures of central activation and one measure of peripheral activation (compound muscle action potential, CMAP… 
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