Central Neural Circuitry in the Jellyfish Aglantha

@article{Mackie2004CentralNC,
  title={Central Neural Circuitry in the Jellyfish Aglantha},
  author={George Owen Mackie},
  journal={Neurosignals},
  year={2004},
  volume={13},
  pages={5 - 19}
}
  • G. Mackie
  • Published 2004
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Neurosignals
Like other hydrozoan medusae, Aglantha lacks a brain, but the two marginal nerve rings function together as a central nervous system. Twelve neuronal and two excitable epithelial conduction systems are described and their interactions summarized. Aglantha differs from most medusae in having giant axons. It can swim and contract its tentacles in two distinct ways (escape and slow). Escape responses are mediated primarily by giant axons but conventional interneurons are also involved in… Expand
Nerves in the endodermal canals of hydromedusae and their role in swimming inhibition
TLDR
Preliminary observations suggest that the “E” system occurs in other medusae including Aglantha digitale (Trachymedusae) where the conduction pathway was previously thought to be an excitable epithelium. Expand
The ring nerve of the box jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora
TLDR
The morphology of the ring nerve of the box jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora is described as ascertained by normal histological techniques, immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy, and the number of cells in theRing nerve is estimated by counting their nuclei. Expand
Do jellyfish have central nervous systems?
  • R. Satterlie
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Experimental Biology
  • 2011
Summary The traditional view of the cnidarian nervous system is of a diffuse nerve net that functions as both a conducting and an integrating system; this is considered an indicator of a primitiveExpand
Nitric oxide regulates swimming in the jellyfish Aglantha digitale
TLDR
It is suggested that an NO/cGMP signaling pathway modulates the rhythmic swimming associated with feeding in Aglantha, possibly by means of putative nitrergic sensory neurons in its tentacles. Expand
Organization of the Ectodermal Nervous Structures in Medusae: Cubomedusae
TLDR
The results offer insight into how the peripheral nerve nets of box jellyfish are organized to produce the complex swimming, feeding, and defensive behaviors observed in cubomedusae. Expand
Multiple Conducting Systems in the Cubomedusa Carybdea marsupialis
TLDR
Three conducting systems have been described as components of the rhopalia-nerve ring centralized system in Carybdea: the swim motor system, the crumple coordination system, and the light-off response system. Expand
Cnidarian Nerve Nets and Neuromuscular Efficiency.
  • R. Satterlie
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Integrative and comparative biology
  • 2015
TLDR
A comparison of neural control of two-dimensional muscle sheets in a mollusc and jellyfish suggests that a possible primitive feature of cnidarian neurons may be a lack of regional specialization into conducting and transmitting regions. Expand
Rhopalia are integrated parts of the central nervous system in box jellyfish
TLDR
Results indicate that cubomedusae have one coherent CNS including the rhopalia, and a novel gastrodermal nerve has been found in the stalk; this nerve is not involved in visual processing but is likely to be mechanosensory and part of a proprioceptory system. Expand
Atlas of the neuromuscular system in the Trachymedusa Aglantha digitale: Insights from the advanced hydrozoan
TLDR
The data uncovered the complex organization of neural networks forming a functional “annulus‐type” central nervous system with three subsets of giant axons, dozen subtypes of neurons, muscles, and a variety of receptors fully integrated with epithelial conductive pathways supporting swimming, escape and feeding behaviors. Expand
Atlas of the Neuromuscular System in the Trachymedusa Aglantha digitale: Insights from the advanced hydrozoan
TLDR
The data uncovered the complex organization of neural networks forming a functional ‘annulus-type’ central nervous system with three subsets of giant axons, dozen subtypes of neurons, muscles and a variety of receptors fully integrated with epithelial conductive pathways supporting swimming, escape and feeding behaviors. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 91 REFERENCES
Central circuitry in the jellyfish Aglantha digitale IV. Pathways coordinating feeding behaviour
TLDR
Cutting experiments showed that the endodermal radial canals, which in other hydromedusae mediate protective `crumpling', provide the conduction pathway for manubrial lip flaring in Aglantha's alternative protective response – escape swimming – makes crumpling unnecessary, releasing the pathway for use in feeding. Expand
Central circuitry in the jellyfish Aglantha digitale. III. The rootlet and pacemaker systems.
TLDR
With the addition of the rootlet pathway, the number of identified systems concerned with locomotion, feeding and tentacle contractions comes to fourteen, and the list is probably nearly complete. Expand
The giant axon escape system of a hydrozoan medusa, Aglantha digitale.
TLDR
Intra- and extracellular recordings from the giant axons indicate that they are involved in the rapid escape swimming response of Aglantha, and a clear understanding is allowed of how the two types of axon co-ordinate escape behaviour. Expand
Neuronal control of locomotion in hydrozoan medusae
TLDR
The swimming control systems of 13 hydromedusan species were examined electrophysiologically and morphologically to suggest that the basic organization of swimming system components is similar and may perform a pacemaker function. Expand
Central circuitry in the jellyfish Aglantha. II: The ring giant and carrier systems
  • Mackie, Meech
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Journal of experimental biology
  • 1995
TLDR
The findings show that the ring giant axon functions in close collaboration with the carrier system, increasing the latter's effective conduction velocity, and that interactions with other neuronal sub-systems are probably mediated exclusively by the carriers. Expand
CENTRAL CIRCUITRY IN THE JELLYFISH AGLANTHA DIGITALE I . THE RELAY SYSTEM
1. The relay system is an interneuronal pathway in the margin of the jellyfish Aglantha digitale. It excites a second interneuronal pathway, the carrier system, and is itself excited by pacemakerExpand
Neurobiology of Polyorchis. II. Structure of effector systems.
The gross and fine morphology of the major effector systems in the anthomedusan, Polyorchis penicillatus, is described and discussed in relation to the known physiological and behavioral propertiesExpand
Central circuitry in the jellyfish Aglantha. I: The relay system
  • Mackie, Meech
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Journal of experimental biology
  • 1995
TLDR
There is no obvious counterpart to the relay system in medusae lacking escape circuitry, and recordings from the epithelial cells that ensheath the ring giant and outer nerve ring neurones show miniature synaptic potentials and other events that seem to reflect events in the nervous system, but no functions can be assigned. Expand
Neuromuscular transmission in the jellyfish Aglantha digitale.
TLDR
Ulastructural evidence confirms that neuro-myoepithelial synapses also occur away from the giant axons, and it is likely that synaptic sites are widespread in the myOepithelium, probably associated with the lateral motor neurones as well as the giant Axon. Expand
Microanatomy of the subumbrellar motor innervation inAglantha digitale (Hydromedusae: Trachylina)
TLDR
The hydrozoan medusaAglantha digitale (Müller 1776) has eight syncytical giant motor axons running from the margin, up the inside of the bell towards the apex, and in this region the inner and outer nerve ringe are connected by axons passing through openings in the intervening mesoglea. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...