Central Nervous System Lesions in Adult Liver Transplant Recipients: Clinical Review with Implications for Management

@article{Singh1994CentralNS,
  title={Central Nervous System Lesions in Adult Liver Transplant Recipients: Clinical Review with Implications for Management},
  author={N. Singh and V. Yu and T. Gayowski},
  journal={Medicine},
  year={1994},
  volume={73},
  pages={110}
}
Our review shows that a wide array of neurologic complications can occur after liver transplantation. Clinical correlation of the neuropathologic lesions may be difficult, as multiple lesions of variable etiologies may coexist, and significant systemic and metabolic complications may obscure the symptoms related to an underlying lesion in the central nervous system. Nevertheless, a reasoned approach to the recognition and diagnosis of these lesions is offered. In the early post-transplantation… Expand
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