Cemetery or sacrifice? Infant burials at the Carthage Tophet

@article{Smith2013CemeteryOS,
  title={Cemetery or sacrifice? Infant burials at the Carthage Tophet},
  author={Patricia Smith and Lawrence E. Stager and Joseph A. Greene and Gal Avishai},
  journal={Antiquity},
  year={2013},
  volume={87},
  pages={1191 - 1199}
}
The recent article on the Carthage Tophet infants by Schwartz et al. (2012) takes issue with our paper (Smith et al. 2011) that claims the Carthaginians practiced infant sacrifice. Both studies were carried out on the same sample of cremated infant remains excavated by the ASOR Punic project between 1975 and 1980 (Stager 1982). We examined the contents of 334 urns while Schwartz et al. (2012) examined the same sample plus an additional fourteen urns (N = 348). We differed, however, in our… 
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