Cellular Scaling Rules for the Brains of an Extended Number of Primate Species

@article{Gabi2010CellularSR,
  title={Cellular Scaling Rules for the Brains of an Extended Number of Primate Species},
  author={Mariana Gabi and Christine E. Collins and Peiyan Wong and Laila Brito Torres and Jon H. Kaas and Suzana Herculano-Houzel},
  journal={Brain, Behavior and Evolution},
  year={2010},
  volume={76},
  pages={32 - 44}
}
What are the rules relating the size of the brain and its structures to the number of cells that compose them and their average sizes? We have shown previously that the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and the remaining brain structures increase in size as a linear function of their numbers of neurons and non-neuronal cells across 6 species of primates. Here we describe that the cellular composition of the same brain structures of 5 other primate species, as well as humans, conform to the scaling… Expand
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