Cellodextrin Transport in Yeast for Improved Biofuel Production

@article{Galazka2010CellodextrinTI,
  title={Cellodextrin Transport in Yeast for Improved Biofuel Production},
  author={Jonathan M. Galazka and Chaoguang Tian and William T. Beeson and Bruno Martinez and N. Louise Glass and Jamie H. D. Cate},
  journal={Science},
  year={2010},
  volume={330},
  pages={84 - 86}
}
Improving Yeast for Biofuel Production The biofuels industry uses the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce ethanol from sugars derived from cornstarch or sugar cane. Plant cell walls are an attractive sugar source; however, yeast does not grow efficiently on cellulose–derived sugars (cellodextrins). Galazka et al. (p. 84, published online 9 September) now show that a model cellolytic fungus Neurospora crassa relies on a cellodextrin transport system to facilitate growth on cellulose. Yeast… 
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