Cell wall appositions and plant disease resistance: Acoustic microscopy of papillae that block fungal ingress.

@article{Israel1980CellWA,
  title={Cell wall appositions and plant disease resistance: Acoustic microscopy of papillae that block fungal ingress.},
  author={Herbert W. Israel and R. G. Wilson and James R. Aist and Hitoshi Kunoh},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={1980},
  volume={77 4},
  pages={
          2046-9
        }
}
  • H. Israel, R. G. Wilson, H. Kunoh
  • Published 1 April 1980
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Plant cells react to localized stress by forming wall appositions outside their protoplasts on the inner surface of their cellulose walls. For many years it has been inferred that appositions elicited by encroaching fungi, termed "papillae," may subsequently also deter them and thus represent a disease-resistance mechanism. Recently, it has been shown that preformed, oversized papillae, experimentally produced in coleoptile cells of compatible barley, Hordeum vulgare, can completely prevent… 

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