Cell Cycle Checkpoints: Preventing an Identity Crisis

@article{Elledge1996CellCC,
  title={Cell Cycle Checkpoints: Preventing an Identity Crisis},
  author={Stephen J. Elledge},
  journal={Science},
  year={1996},
  volume={274},
  pages={1664 - 1672}
}
  • S. Elledge
  • Published 6 December 1996
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Science
Cell cycle checkpoints are regulatory pathways that control the order and timing of cell cycle transitions and ensure that critical events such as DNA replication and chromosome segregation are completed with high fidelity. In addition, checkpoints respond to damage by arresting the cell cycle to provide time for repair and by inducing transcription of genes that facilitate repair. Checkpoint loss results in genomic instability and has been implicated in the evolution of normal cells into… 
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