Cell Biology of Laryngeal Epithelial Defenses in Health and Disease: Further Studies

@article{Johnston2003CellBO,
  title={Cell Biology of Laryngeal Epithelial Defenses in Health and Disease: Further Studies},
  author={Nikki Johnston and David M. Bulmer and Peter E. Ross and Sophie E. Axford and Gulnaz A Gill and Jeffrey Peter Pearson and Peter William Dettmar and Marguerite Panetti and Massimo Pignatelli and James A. Koufman},
  journal={Annals of Otology, Rhinology \& Laryngology},
  year={2003},
  volume={112},
  pages={481 - 491}
}
This is the second annual report of an international collaborative research group that is examining the cellular impact of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) on laryngeal epithelium. [] Key Method Carbonic anhydrase (CA), E-cadherin, and MUC gene expression were analyzed in patients with LPR, in controls, and in an in vitro model. In patients with LPR, we found decreased levels of CAIII in vocal fold epithelium and increased levels in posterior commissure epithelium. The experimental studies confirm that…

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