Celiac disease, posterior cerebral calcifications and epilepsy

@article{Gobbi1992CeliacDP,
  title={Celiac disease, posterior cerebral calcifications and epilepsy},
  author={Giuseppe Gobbi and Paolo Ambrosetto and M. G. Zaniboni and Andrea Lambertini and G. Ambrosioni and Carlo Alberto Tassinari},
  journal={Brain and Development},
  year={1992},
  volume={14},
  pages={23-29}
}
Ten patients (5 males) affected by epilepsy with cerebral calcifications of unknown etiology mainly located in the posterior regions were subjected to a battery of tests including an intestinal biopsy. Our aim was to establish whether or not the patients also suffered from celiac disease. Celiac diseases was found in 6 patients. This result and the individual cases reported in the literature suggest that this triad of diseases (celiac disease, posterior cerebral calcifications and epilepsy) are… 
Epilepsy and occipital calcifications with or without celiac disease: Report of four cases
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It is suggested that celiac disease can be suspected in the presence of cerebral calcifications and epilepsy, which can be completely asymptomatic in teenagers and young adults.
A Case of Celiac Disease, Epilepsy, and Cerebral Calcifications With Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.
TLDR
A 55-year-old man with medication refractory right temporal lobe epilepsy since adolescence was found to have bilateral posterior cerebral calcifications on routine head computed tomography with confirmation on magnetic resonance imaging and diagnosed with the rare, but well-described syndrome of celiac disease, epilepsy, and cerebral calcification.
Epilepsy in coeliac disease: not just a matter of calcifications
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Coeliac disease, epilepsy and cerebral calcifications
  • G. Gobbi
  • Medicine
    Brain and Development
  • 2005
TLDR
The progressive growth and late occurrence of CC before beginning a GFD, the demonstration of anti-gliadin antibodies in the cerebro-spinal fluid and the association with HLA class II genes suggest that an immune reaction originating from the jejunal mucosa, triggered by gliadin in gluten intolerance predisposed subjects (HLA phenotype) may be responsible for seizures and CC.
Cortical vascular abnormalities in the syndrome of celiac disease, epilepsy, bilateral occipital calcifications, and folate deficiency
The pathological changes in the syndrome of celiac disease, folate deficiency, bilateral occipital calcifications, and intractable epilepsy have not been previously described. A child with this
Association between Coeliac Disease, Epilepsy and Brain Atrophy
TLDR
Prevalence of CD was increased among patients with epilepsy of unknown aetiology, but the combination of CD, epilepsy and intracranial posterior calcifications was rare in Finnish adult epilepsy population.
Neurological Manifestations of Celiac Disease
TLDR
In this study, a short review to go through the neurological presentations and problems of Celiac disease was embarked on.
Neurologic presentation of celiac disease.
TLDR
It has been suggested that gluten sensitivity (as evidenced by high antigliadin antibodies) is a common cause of neurologic syndromes (notably cerebellar ataxia) of otherwise unknown cause and further studies clearly are needed to assess the efficacy of gluten-free diet and to address the underlying mechanisms of nervous system pathology in gluten sensitivity.
Neuropsychiatric manifestations in celiac disease
TLDR
A thorough review of existing evidence for neurological manifestations of Celiac disease is performed, providing an up-to-date description of prevalence and examining the pathogenetic mechanisms possibly involved.
Prevalence of celiac antibodies in children with neurologic disorders.
TLDR
Results did not demonstrate any relationship between common neurologic disorders without a specific diagnosis during childhood and CD, and screening for CD does not need to be routinely included in the diagnostic evaluation of children with these disorders.
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