Cebus Phylogenetic Relationships: A Preliminary Reassessment of the Diversity of the Untufted Capuchin Monkeys

@article{Boubli2012CebusPR,
  title={Cebus Phylogenetic Relationships: A Preliminary Reassessment of the Diversity of the Untufted Capuchin Monkeys},
  author={Jean P. Boubli and Anthony B. Rylands and Izeni Pires Farias and M. Alfaro and Jessica W. Lynch Alfaro},
  journal={American Journal of Primatology},
  year={2012},
  volume={74}
}
The untufted, or gracile, capuchin monkeys are currently classified in four species, Cebus albifrons, C. capucinus, C. olivaceus, and C. kaapori, with all but C. kaapori having numerous described subspecies. The taxonomy is controversial and their geographic distributions are poorly known. Cebus albifrons is unusual in its disjunct distribution, with a western and central Amazonian range, a separate range in the northern Andes in Colombia, and isolated populations in Trinidad and west of the… 
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