Cdv‐based cell division and cell cycle organization in the thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus

@article{Pelve2011CdvbasedCD,
  title={Cdv‐based cell division and cell cycle organization in the thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus},
  author={E. Pelve and A. Lind{\aa}s and W. Martens-Habbena and J. R. de la Torre and D. Stahl and R. Bernander},
  journal={Molecular Microbiology},
  year={2011},
  volume={82}
}
Cell division is mediated by different mechanisms in different evolutionary lineages. While bacteria and euryarchaea utilize an FtsZ‐based mechanism, most crenarchaea divide using the Cdv system, related to the eukaryotic ESCRT‐III machinery. Intriguingly, thaumarchaeal genomes encode both FtsZ and Cdv protein homologues, raising the question of their division mode. Here, we provide evidence indicating that Cdv is the primary division system in the thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. We… Expand

Topics from this paper

Split decision: a thaumarchaeon encoding both FtsZ and Cdv cell division proteins chooses Cdv for cytokinesis
TLDR
It is found that cells of the thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus likely divide using the Cdv system and not FtsZ, based on localization of Cd v proteins but not FTSZ to division sites. Expand
The Nitrosopumilus maritimus CdvB, but Not FtsZ, Assembles into Polymers
TLDR
It is proposed that it is Cdv proteins, rather than FtsZ, that function as the cell division apparatus in N. maritimus. Expand
Mapping of active replication origins in vivo in thaum‐ and euryarchaeal replicons
TLDR
Mapping of active replication origins in thaum‐ and euryarchaeal replicons using high‐throughput sequencing‐based marker frequency analysis finds Origin recognition boxes that provide binding sites for Orc1/Cdc6 replication initiator proteins are identified at all chromosomal origins, as well as in a range of additional thaum archaeal species. Expand
Dividing the Archaeal Way: The Ancient Cdv Cell-Division Machinery
TLDR
It is suggested that the Cdv system functions differently in archaea than ESCRT does in eukaryotes, and that, unlike the eUKaryotic case, the C dv system's main function may be related to surplus membrane invagination and cell-wall synthesis. Expand
Four chromosome replication origins in the archaeon Pyrobaculum calidifontis
TLDR
It is shown that core gene distribution provides a useful tool for origin identification in archaea, and can be predicted to predict multiple replication origins in a range of species. Expand
Archaeal extracellular vesicles are produced in an ESCRT-dependent manner and promote gene transfer and nutrient cycling in extreme environments
TLDR
It is demonstrated that EVs produced by a hyperthermophilic and acidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus carry not only diverse proteins but also chromosomal and plasmid DNA, and can transfer this DNA to recipient cells, suggesting that ESCRT-mediated EV biogenesis has deep evolutionary roots. Expand
Comparing contractile apparatus‐driven cytokinesis mechanisms across kingdoms
TLDR
In this article, the mechanisms of cytokinesis in diverse organisms dividing through the use of a contractile apparatus are compared and cytoskeletal polymer dynamics alone appears to be sufficient for force generation during prokaryotic cytokineis. Expand
The cell cycle of archaea
TLDR
The current understanding of the archaeal cell cycle and cytoskeleton is outlined, with an emphasis on species in the genus Sulfolobus, and the major outstanding questions in the field are considered. Expand
Archaeal extracellular vesicles are produced in an ESCRT-dependent manner and promote gene transfer and nutrient cycling in extreme environments.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that EVs produced by a hyperthermophilic and acidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus carry not only a diverse proteome, enriched in membrane proteins, but also chromosomal and plasmid DNA, and can transfer this DNA to recipient cells, suggesting that ESCRT-mediated EV biogenesis has deep evolutionary roots. Expand
Protein domain patterns reveal a functional diversity of the archaeal Cdv system and give insights into the origin of the eukaryotic ESCRT system
TLDR
A comprehensive mechanistic theory of Cdv-based cell division based on protein domains is inferred that correctly predicts the functional differences found between organisms in experiments and describes the protein evolution that underlies this functional diversity. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 61 REFERENCES
A unique cell division machinery in the Archaea
TLDR
Two of the Cdv proteins display homology to components of the eukaryotic ESCRT-III sorting complex involved in budding of luminal vesicles and HIV-1 virion release, suggesting mechanistic similarities and a common evolutionary origin. Expand
Cell cycle regulation in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius
TLDR
Inhibition of the elongation stage of chromosome replication resulted in cell division arrest, indicating that pathways similar to checkpoint mechanisms in eukaryotes, and the SOS system of bacteria, also exist in archaea. Expand
Cell cycle characteristics of thermophilic archaea
TLDR
The in vivo organization of the chromosome DNA appeared to be different from that of eubacteria, as revealed by variation in the relative binding efficiency of different DNA stains. Expand
Chromosome replication patterns in the hyperthermophilic euryarchaea Archaeoglobus fulgidus and Methanocaldococcus (Methanococcus) jannaschii
Summary We analysed chromosome replication patterns in the two hyperthermophilic euryarchaea Archaeoglobus fulgidus and Methanocaldococcus (Methanococcus) jannaschii by marker frequency analysisExpand
Cell Cycle Characteristics of Crenarchaeota: Unity among Diversity
TLDR
In Pyrobaculum, chromosome segregation overlapped with or closely followed DNA replication, and further genome separation appeared to occur concomitant with cellular growth, and cell division in P. aerophilum took place without visible constriction. Expand
FtsZ-less cell division in archaea and bacteria.
TLDR
Cytokinesis mechanisms in clades and individual taxa are likely to include adaptation of host functions to division of bacterial symbionts, transfer of bacterial division genes into the host genome, vesicle formation without a dedicated constriction machinery, cross-wall formation without invagination, as well as entirely novel division mechanisms. Expand
Nucleoid structure and distribution in thermophilic Archaea
TLDR
There was a considerable time interval between termination of chromosome replication and completion of nucleoid separation, similar to the G2 phase in eukaryotic cells. Expand
Genome-wide transcription map of an archaeal cell cycle
TLDR
The results allow detailed characterization of the genome segregation, division, and replication processes and may, because of the extensive homologies between the archaeal and eukaryotic information machineries, also be applicable to core features of the eUKaryotic cell cycle. Expand
A Role for the ESCRT System in Cell Division in Archaea
TLDR
It is found that Sulfolobus ESCRT-III and Vps4 homologs underwent regulation of their expression during the cell cycle, and these proteins specifically localized to the mid-cell during cell division. Expand
Potential role of cellular ESCRT proteins in the STIV life cycle.
TLDR
It is hypothesized that the archaeal virus STIV takes advantage of the Sulfolobus ESCRT machinery for virus assembly, transport and cellular lysis, and the potential role that these proteins play during viral infection and lysis is examined. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...