Causes of extinction of vertebrates during the Holocene of mainland Australia: arrival of the dingo, or human impact?

@article{Johnson2003CausesOE,
  title={Causes of extinction of vertebrates during the Holocene of mainland Australia: arrival of the dingo, or human impact?},
  author={Christopher N. Johnson and Stephen Wroe},
  journal={The Holocene},
  year={2003},
  volume={13},
  pages={941 - 948}
}
The arrival of the dingo in mainland Australia is believed to have caused the extinction of three native vertebrates: the thylacine, the Tasmanian devil and the Tasmanian native hen. The dingo is implicated in these extinctions because, while these three species disappeared during the late Holocene of mainland Aus tralia in the presence of the dingo, they persisted in Tasmania in its absence. Moreover, the dingo might plausibly have competed with the thylacine and devil, and preyed on the… 
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