Causes and consequences of phenotypic plasticity in body size: the case of the yellow dung fly Scathophaga stercoraria (Diptera: Scathophagidae).

@inproceedings{Blanckenhorn2009CausesAC,
  title={Causes and consequences of phenotypic plasticity in body size: the case of the yellow dung fly Scathophaga stercoraria (Diptera: Scathophagidae).},
  author={W. Blanckenhorn and D. Whitman and T. Ananthakrishnan},
  year={2009}
}
Phenotypic plasticity occurs when a particular genotype assumes different phenotypes depending on its environment. In this article, I focus on phenotypic plasticity in body size and associated life history traits, primarily growth rate and development time, thus taking a trait-centered view. First, I discuss and review phenotypic plasticity in body size in insects in general, centering on its environmental causes and its behavioral and fitness consequences. Plasticity in body size can be caused… Expand
Critical weight mediates sex‐specific body size plasticity and sexual dimorphism in the yellow dung fly Scathophaga stercoraria (Diptera: Scathophagidae)
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The physiological basis of adaptive size variation in the yellow dung fly Scathophaga stercoraria is investigated and it is demonstrated that integral growth rates, which are typically calculated as simple ratios of egg‐to‐adult development time and adult weight, do not necessarily well reflect variation in instantaneous growth rates. Expand
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  • W. Blanckenhorn
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 2015
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The results confirm the temperature‐size rule (smaller when warmer) and, albeit entirely correlational, could be mediated by climate change, as over this period mean temperature at the site increased by 0.5°C, although alternative systematic environmental changes cannot be entirely excluded. Expand
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TLDR
Artificial selection producing larger yellow dung flies than occur in nature revealed some, albeit weak mortality costs of large body size that otherwise might have remained cryptic, but it is concluded that these costs are insufficient to explain the evolutionary limits oflarge body size in this species. Expand
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Sex differences in phenotypic plasticity of a mechanism that controls body size: implications for sexual size dimorphism
TLDR
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Distinguishing between anticipatory and responsive plasticity in a seasonally polyphenic butterfly
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Stage- and sex-specific heat tolerance in the yellow dung fly Scathophaga stercoraria.
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The results illustrate that temperature stress, even when moderate and temporary, during early development can have profound lethal and non-lethal fitness-consequences later in life. Expand
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