Causes and consequences of cannibalism in noncarnivorous insects.

@article{Richardson2010CausesAC,
  title={Causes and consequences of cannibalism in noncarnivorous insects.},
  author={Matthew L. Richardson and Robert F. Mitchell and Peter F. Reagel and Lawrence M. Hanks},
  journal={Annual review of entomology},
  year={2010},
  volume={55},
  pages={
          39-53
        }
}
We review the primary literature to document the incidence of cannibalism among insects that typically are not carnivorous. Most of the cannibalistic species were coleopterans and lepidopterans, and the cannibals often were juveniles that aggregate or that overlap in phenology with the egg stage. Cannibalism can be adaptive by improving growth rate, survivorship, vigor, longevity, and fecundity. It also can play an important role in regulating population density and suppressing population… CONTINUE READING
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