Causes and Consequences of a Lack of Coevolution in Müllerian mimicry

@article{Mallet2004CausesAC,
  title={Causes and Consequences of a Lack of Coevolution in M{\"u}llerian mimicry},
  author={J. Mallet},
  journal={Evolutionary Ecology},
  year={2004},
  volume={13},
  pages={777-806}
}
  • J. Mallet
  • Published 2004
  • Biology
  • Evolutionary Ecology
Müllerian mimicry, in which both partners are unpalatable to predators, is often used as an example of a coevolved mutualism. However, it is theoretically possible that some Müllerian mimics are parasitic if a weakly defended mimic benefits at the expense of a more highly defended model, a phenomenon known as ‘quasi-Batesian mimicry’. The theory expounded by Müller and extended here for unequal unpalatability, on the other hand, suggests that quasi-Batesian mimicry should be rare in comparison… Expand

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