Causal knowledge as a prerequisite for confounding evaluation: an application to birth defects epidemiology.

@article{Hernn2002CausalKA,
  title={Causal knowledge as a prerequisite for confounding evaluation: an application to birth defects epidemiology.},
  author={Miguel A. Hern{\'a}n and Sonia Hern{\'a}ndez-D{\'i}az and Martha M Werler and Allen A. Mitchell},
  journal={American journal of epidemiology},
  year={2002},
  volume={155 2},
  pages={176-84}
}
Common strategies to decide whether a variable is a confounder that should be adjusted for in the analysis rely mostly on statistical criteria. The authors present findings from the Slone Epidemiology Unit Birth Defects Study, 1992-1997, a case-control study on folic acid supplementation and risk of neural tube defects. When statistical strategies for confounding evaluation are used, the adjusted odds ratio is 0.80 (95% confidence interval: 0.62, 1.21). However, the consideration of a priori… CONTINUE READING
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