Catullus 17 and 67, and the Catullan Construct

@article{Deuling2006Catullus1A,
  title={Catullus 17 and 67, and the Catullan Construct},
  author={Judy K. Deuling},
  journal={Antichthon},
  year={2006},
  volume={40},
  pages={1 - 9}
}
In Love by the Numbers Helena Dettmer suggests that poem 17, which begins o Colonia, quae cupis ponte ludere longo, belongs to a disparate group of poems within the Catullan corpus, which contains poems with personified inanimate objects. Yet two of that larger group, poem 17 and poem 67 (addressed to a house door or ianua), are more closely drawn together by their settings, which the author hints are northern and specific while leaving them undefined and general. Furthermore, the two represent… 
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