Cattle near the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda, as a reservoir of Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia duodenalis for local community and free-ranging gorillas

@article{Nizeyi2001CattleNT,
  title={Cattle near the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda, as a reservoir of Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia duodenalis for local community and free-ranging gorillas},
  author={John Bosco Nizeyi and Michael R. Cranfield and Thaddeus K. Graczyk},
  journal={Parasitology Research},
  year={2001},
  volume={88},
  pages={380-385}
}
Abstract. The prevalence and intensity of shedding of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and Giardia duodenalis cysts was investigated in cattle grazing in the vicinity of the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda. The prevalence of cryptosporidiosis and giardiosis was 38% and 12%, respectively, with 10% concomitant infections. Shedding intensity varied from 130 to 450 oocysts/g (mean of 215 oocysts/g) and from 110 to 270 cysts/g (mean of 156 cysts/g). Significantly more pre-weaned than post… Expand
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