Cats in the forest: predicting habitat adaptations from humerus morphometry in extant and fossil Felidae (Carnivora)

@inproceedings{Meloro2013CatsIT,
  title={Cats in the forest: predicting habitat adaptations from humerus morphometry in extant and fossil Felidae (Carnivora)},
  author={Carlo Meloro and Sarah Elton and Julien Louys and Laura C. Bishop and Peter W Ditchfield},
  booktitle={Paleobiology},
  year={2013}
}
Abstract Mammalian carnivores are rarely incorporated in paleoenvironmental reconstructions, largely because of their rarity within the fossil record. However, multivariate statistical modeling can be successfully used to quantify specific anatomical features as environmental predictors. Here we explore morphological variability of the humerus in a closely related group of predators (Felidae) to investigate the relationship between morphometric descriptors and habitat categories. We analyze… 
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