Catheterization of the heart in man with use of a flow-directed balloon-tipped catheter.

@article{Swan1970CatheterizationOT,
  title={Catheterization of the heart in man with use of a flow-directed balloon-tipped catheter.},
  author={Harold J. C. Swan and William Ganz and James S. Forrester and Harold S. Marcus and George A. Diamond and David W. Chonette},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={1970},
  volume={283 9},
  pages={
          447-51
        }
}
Abstract Pressures in the right side of the heart and pulmonary capillary wedge can be obtained by cardiac catheterization without the aid of fluoroscopy. A No. 5 Fr double-lumen catheter with a balloon just proximal to the tip is inserted into the right atrium under pressure monitoring. The balloon is then inflated with 0.8 ml of air. The balloon is carried by blood flow through the right side of the heart into the smaller radicles of the pulmonary artery. In this position when the balloon is… 

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