Catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation: chronic preclinical evidence for renal artery safety

@article{Rippy2011CatheterbasedRS,
  title={Catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation: chronic preclinical evidence for renal artery safety},
  author={Marian K. Rippy and Denise Zarins and Neil C. Barman and Andrew Wu and Keith L. Duncan and Christopher K. Zarins},
  journal={Clinical Research in Cardiology},
  year={2011},
  volume={100},
  pages={1095-1101}
}
BackgroundRenal sympathetic hyperactivity is associated with hypertension, a leading cause of mortality worldwide. Renal sympathetic denervation via the Symplicity Catheter System has been shown to decrease blood pressure by 33/11 mmHg by 6 months, with no radiofrequency (RF)-related adverse sequelae visible by CT/MR angiography or renal duplex ultrasound 6 months after the procedure. Here, we present preclinical work predating those clinical results. We performed therapeutic renal sympathetic… Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Early morphologic alterations in renal artery wall and renal nerves in response to catheter-based renal denervation procedure in sheep: difference between single-point and multiple-point ablation catheters.
TLDR
The morphologic changes elicited by application of both RDN systems appeared to be dependent on individual anatomical variability of renal nerves in the sheep, which may limit the therapeutic effectiveness of RDN procedures used in patients with resistant hypertension. Expand
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TLDR
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Renal Artery Vasodilation May Be An Indicator of Successful Sympathetic Nerve Damage During Renal Denervation Procedure
TLDR
In conclusion, renal artery vasodilation, induced by RDN, may be a possible indicator of successful renal nerve damage and a predictor of blood pressure response to RDN. Expand
Is an Abnormal Vascular Response After Renal Sympathetic Denervation Predictive of Permanent Damage?: An Unusual Case of Late Renal Artery Stenosis After Energy Delivery
TLDR
Renal denervation can be complicated by local tissue injury at the ablation sites that could be a possible trigger of late arterial disease. Expand
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