Catecholamine exocytosis during low frequency stimulation in mouse adrenal chromaffin cells is primarily asynchronous and controlled by the novel mechanism of Ca2+ syntilla suppression.

@article{Lefkowitz2014CatecholamineED,
  title={Catecholamine exocytosis during low frequency stimulation in mouse adrenal chromaffin cells is primarily asynchronous and controlled by the novel mechanism of Ca2+ syntilla suppression.},
  author={Jason J. Lefkowitz and Valerie DeCrescenzo and Kailai L Duan and Karl D. Bellv{\'e} and Kevin E. Fogarty and John V. Walsh and Ronghua Zhuge},
  journal={The Journal of physiology},
  year={2014},
  volume={592 21},
  pages={4639-55}
}
Adrenal chromaffin cells (ACCs), stimulated by the splanchnic nerve, generate action potentials (APs) at a frequency near 0.5 Hz in the resting physiological state, at times described as 'rest and digest'. How such low frequency stimulation in turn elicits sufficient catecholamine exocytosis to set basal sympathetic tone is not readily explained by the classical mechanism of stimulus-secretion coupling, where exocytosis is synchronized to AP-induced Ca(2+) influx. By using simulated action… CONTINUE READING