Caste and Class in Haiti

@article{Lobb1940CasteAC,
  title={Caste and Class in Haiti},
  author={John Lobb},
  journal={American Journal of Sociology},
  year={1940},
  volume={46},
  pages={23 - 34}
}
  • John Lobb
  • Published 1 July 1940
  • Economics
  • American Journal of Sociology
The stratification of Haitian society is, in pattern, that of a caste system surviving from the country's early history as a French colony, while in function it forms a class structure. It is composed of two clearly delineated classes, the Elite ad the Noirs. They are definable and separated in the following criteria: size, place of residence, physical stigmata, and, most important, cultural differences. Movement between them takes place according to certain general requirements which determine… 
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