Cassini Observes the Active South Pole of Enceladus

@article{Porco2006CassiniOT,
  title={Cassini Observes the Active South Pole of Enceladus},
  author={C. Porco and P. Helfenstein and P. Thomas and A. Ingersoll and J. Wisdom and R. West and G. Neukum and T. Denk and R. Wagner and T. Roatsch and S. Kieffer and E. Turtle and A. McEwen and T. Johnson and J. Rathbun and J. Veverka and D. Wilson and J. Perry and J. Spitale and A. Brahic and J. Burns and A. Delgenio and L. Dones and C. Murray and S. Squyres},
  journal={Science},
  year={2006},
  volume={311},
  pages={1393 - 1401}
}
Cassini has identified a geologically active province at the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus. In images acquired by the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), this region is circumscribed by a chain of folded ridges and troughs at ∼55°S latitude. The terrain southward of this boundary is distinguished by its albedo and color contrasts, elevated temperatures, extreme geologic youth, and narrow tectonic rifts that exhibit coarse-grained ice and coincide with the hottest temperatures measured in… Expand

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