Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer: Enceladus Plume Composition and Structure

@article{Waite2006CassiniIA,
  title={Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer: Enceladus Plume Composition and Structure},
  author={Jack Hunter Waite and Michael R. Combi and Wing-H. Ip and Thomas E. Cravens and Ralph L. McNutt and Wayne T. Kasprzak and Roger V. Yelle and Janet G. Luhmann and Hasso Bernhard Otto Niemann and David A. Gell and Brian A. Magee and G. G. Fletcher and Jonathan I. Lunine and Wei-Ling Tseng},
  journal={Science},
  year={2006},
  volume={311},
  pages={1419 - 1422}
}
The Cassini spacecraft passed within 168.2 kilometers of the surface above the southern hemisphere at 19:55:22 universal time coordinated on 14 July 2005 during its closest approach to Enceladus. Before and after this time, a substantial atmospheric plume and coma were observed, detectable in the Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) data set out to a distance of over 4000 kilometers from Enceladus. INMS data indicate that the atmospheric plume and coma are dominated by water, with… 
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