Cassini Encounters Enceladus: Background and the Discovery of a South Polar Hot Spot

@article{Spencer2006CassiniEE,
  title={Cassini Encounters Enceladus: Background and the Discovery of a South Polar Hot Spot},
  author={J. Spencer and J. Pearl and M. Segura and F. Flasar and A. Mamoutkine and P. Romani and B. Buratti and A. Hendrix and L. Spilker and R. Lopes},
  journal={Science},
  year={2006},
  volume={311},
  pages={1401 - 1405}
}
  • J. Spencer, J. Pearl, +7 authors R. Lopes
  • Published 2006
  • Geology, Medicine
  • Science
  • The Cassini spacecraft completed three close flybys of Saturn's enigmatic moon Enceladus between February and July 2005. On the third and closest flyby, on 14 July 2005, multiple Cassini instruments detected evidence for ongoing endogenic activity in a region centered on Enceladus' south pole. The polar region is the source of a plume of gas and dust, which probably emanates from prominent warm troughs seen on the surface. Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) detected 3 to 7… CONTINUE READING
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