Cassini Dust Measurements at Enceladus and Implications for the Origin of the E Ring

@article{Spahn2006CassiniDM,
  title={Cassini Dust Measurements at Enceladus and Implications for the Origin of the E Ring},
  author={F. Spahn and J. Schmidt and N. Albers and M. H{\"o}rning and M. Makuch and M. Sei{\ss} and S. Kempf and R. Srama and V. Dikarev and S. Helfert and G. Moragas-Klostermeyer and A. Krivov and M. Srem̌cev{\'i}c and A. Tuzzolino and T. Economou and E. Gr{\"u}n},
  journal={Science},
  year={2006},
  volume={311},
  pages={1416 - 1418}
}
During Cassini's close flyby of Enceladus on 14 July 2005, the High Rate Detector of the Cosmic Dust Analyzer registered micron-sized dust particles enveloping this satellite. The dust impact rate peaked about 1 minute before the closest approach of the spacecraft to the moon. This asymmetric signature is consistent with a locally enhanced dust production in the south polar region of Enceladus. Other Cassini experiments revealed evidence for geophysical activities near Enceladus' south pole: a… Expand

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