Carotenoids and Flavonoids Contribute to Nutritional Protection against Skin Damage from Sunlight

@article{Stahl2007CarotenoidsAF,
  title={Carotenoids and Flavonoids Contribute to Nutritional Protection against Skin Damage from Sunlight},
  author={Wilhelm Stahl and Helmut Sies},
  journal={Molecular Biotechnology},
  year={2007},
  volume={37},
  pages={26-30}
}
  • W. Stahl, H. Sies
  • Published 9 August 2007
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Molecular Biotechnology
The concept of photoprotection by dietary means is gaining momentum. Plant constituents such as carotenoids and flavonoids are involved in protection against excess light in plants and contribute to the prevention of UV damage in humans. As micronutrients, they are ingested with the diet and are distributed into light-exposed tissues, such as skin or the eye where they provide systemic photoprotection. β-Carotene and lycopene prevent UV-induced erythema formation. Likewise, dietary flavanols… 
Skin protection against UV light by dietary antioxidants.
TLDR
This review summarizes the literature concerning the use of dietary antioxidants as systemic photoprotective agents towards skin damage induced by UVA and UVB and suggests that daily consumption of dietary polyphenols may provide efficient protection against the harmful effects of solar UV radiation in humans.
Photoprotection by dietary carotenoids: concept, mechanisms, evidence and future development.
TLDR
In vitro data show that not only β-Carotene but also other carotenoids are efficient photoprotectors, among them are lutein and structurally unusual phenolic polyenes like 3,3'-dihydroxyisorenieratene.
Skin photoprotection and nutraceuticals: an overview
TLDR
Human dietary intervention studies using carotenoids combined with vitamins, polyunsaturated fatty acid, minerals and natural phytoextract ingredients show promise in protecting against pollutant and solar-induced effects.
Botanical Antioxidants for Protection Against Damage from Sunlight
TLDR
The use of antioxidant-rich botanicals as dietary sources, and/or supplementing skin care products with theseBotanicals for daily use, may be an effective approach for reducing UV-induced photodamage and skin cancer.
Nutritional approach to sun protection: a suggested complement to external strategies.
The increasing incidence of skin cancer despite the use of externally applied sun protection strategies, alongside research showing that nutrients reduce photo-oxidative damage, suggest nutritional
Can natural products improve skin photoprotection?
Abstract Due to increased UV radiation on the Earth’s surface, caused by depletion of the stratospheric ozone, people have become more susceptible to different types of skin damage, such as erythema,
Pharmacognosy Can natural products improve skin photoprotection?
Due to increased UV radiation on the Earth’s surface, caused by depletion of the stratospheric ozone, people have become more susceptible to different types of skin damage, such as erythema,
Contribution of Topical Antioxidants to Maintain Healthy Skin—A Review
The skin is constantly exposed to various environmental stresses, in particular to the damage caused by pollution and ultraviolet radiation (UV), and as a consequence, the horny extract can be
Carotenoids as Functional Bioactive Compounds
Carotenoids are hydrocarbon compound consisting of conjugated double bond system responsible for the red to pink colors found in seeds, fruits and vegetables. Carotenoids are classified into two
Non-sunscreen photoprotection: antioxidants add value to a sunscreen.
  • M. Matsui, A. Hsia, +4 authors E. Baron
  • Biology, Medicine
    The journal of investigative dermatology. Symposium proceedings
  • 2009
TLDR
The addition of botanical antioxidants and vitamins C and E to a broad-spectrum sunscreen may further decrease UV-induced damage compared with sunscreen alone, and add value when applied topically to human skin in vivo.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 48 REFERENCES
Nutritional protection against skin damage from sunlight.
TLDR
Dietary protection is provided by carotenoids, tocopherols, ascorbate, flavonoids, or n-3 fatty acids, contributing to maintenance resistance as part of lifelong protection.
Lycopene-rich products and dietary photoprotection.
TLDR
Following ingestion of lycopene or tomato-derived products rich in Lycopene, photoprotective effects have been demonstrated and after 10-12 weeks of intervention a decrease in the sensitivity towards UV-induced erythema was observed in volunteers.
Dietary tomato paste protects against ultraviolet light-induced erythema in humans.
TLDR
It is feasible to achieve protection against UV light-induced erythema by ingestion of a commonly consumed dietary source of lycopene, and no significant difference between groups was found at wk 4 of treatment.
Carotenoids and carotenoids plus vitamin E protect against ultraviolet light-induced erythema in humans.
TLDR
The antioxidants used in this study provided protection against erythema in humans and may be useful for diminishing sensitivity to ultraviolet light.
Effects of oral vitamin E and beta-carotene supplementation on ultraviolet radiation-induced oxidative stress in human skin.
TLDR
Although vitamin E supplements significantly reduced the skin malondialdehyde concentration, neither supplement affected other measures of UVR-induced oxidative stress in human skin, which suggested no photoprotection of supplementation.
Antioxidant activity of carotenoids.
TLDR
There is increasing evidence from human studies that carotenoids protect the skin against photooxidative damage.
UV light, beta-carotene and human skin--beneficial and potentially harmful effects.
TLDR
Though beta-carotene has been successfully used against photosensitivity in patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria, its beneficial potential in normal skin is still uncertain and intake of oral beta- carotene supplements before sun exposure has been recommended on a population-wide basis.
Supplementation with beta-carotene or a similar amount of mixed carotenoids protects humans from UV-induced erythema.
TLDR
Long-term supplementation for 12 wk with 24 mg/d of a carotenoid mix supplying similar amounts of beta-carotene, lutein and lycopene ameliorates UV-induced erythema in humans; the effect is comparable to daily treatment with 24mg of Beta- carotene alone.
Supplementation with tomato-based products increases lycopene, phytofluene, and phytoene levels in human serum and protects against UV-light-induced erythema.
  • O. Aust, W. Stahl, H. Sies, H. Tronnier, U. Heinrich
  • Chemistry, Medicine
    International journal for vitamin and nutrition research. Internationale Zeitschrift fur Vitamin- und Ernahrungsforschung. Journal international de vitaminologie et de nutrition
  • 2005
TLDR
After 12 weeks of supplementation, significant increases in lycopene serum levels and total skin carotenoids were observed in all groups, indicating prevention of erythema formation and the protective effect was more pronounced in the Lyc-o-Mato and Lyc -o-Guard-Drink groups.
Systemic beta carotene plus topical UV-sunscreen are an optimal protection against harmful effects of natural UV-sunlight : results of the Berlin-Eilath study
TLDR
Presupplementation with moderate doses of beta carotene before and during natural sunlight exposure combined with topical sunscreens are more effective than sunscreen cream alone.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...