Carotenoids, parasites, and sexual selection

@article{Lozano1994CarotenoidsPA,
  title={Carotenoids, parasites, and sexual selection},
  author={George A. Lozano},
  journal={Oikos},
  year={1994},
  volume={70},
  pages={309-311}
}
In recent years carotenoids have become increasingly important in the study of sexual selection. Endler (1980) found that the colour pattern diversity and conspicuousness of males of a population of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) increased after a few generations without predation. He argued that males, emancipated from the constraints of predation, were able to respond better to sexual selection brought about by female preference for colourful males. He subsequently (Endler 1983) showed that in… 

Sexual dichromatism in birds independent of diet, parasites and androgens

It is suggested that neglected physiological processes may regulate carotenoids, and hence some colour variation need not be explained by parasites, androgens or diet.

Male Mate Preference for Female Coloration in a Cyprinid Fish, Puntius titteya.

It is suggested that males and females in this species mutually select each other based on red coloration, and males might obtain high quality mates and offspring by choosing females based on carotenoid-based coloration.

Regulation of integumentary colour and plasma carotenoids in American Kestrels consistent with sexual selection theory

The results suggest kestrels may have the ability to regulate (rather than merely control) their colour physiologically, the variation in colour and carotenoids is consistent with that expected of a sexually selected trait, and the loss of colour after breeding may suggest a trade-off between the show and health functions of carOTenoids.

Carotenoid-dependent coloration of male American kestrels predicts ability to reduce parasitic infections

It is argued that parasite-mediated models of sexual selection may have an implicit temporal component that many researchers have ignored, and carotenoid-dependent traits can signal past parasite exposure, current levels of parasitism, or the ability of individuals to manage parasitic infections in the future.

EFFECTS OF COCCIDIAL AND MYCOPLASMAL INFECTIONS ON CAROTENOID-BASED PLUMAGE PIGMENTATION IN MALE HOUSE FINCHES

Observations found that captive male House Finches experimentally infected with Isospora spp.

Adjustment of female reproductive investment according to male carotenoid-based ornamentation in a gallinaceous bird

It is revealed that female red-legged partridges may adjust their breeding investment according to male carotenoid-based ornamentation, which predicts that females mated with more attractive males should lay more and better eggs.

Fitness correlates of male coloration in a Lake Victoria cichlid fish

In a wild population, it was found that variation in male coloration was not associated with variation in a set of strongly intercorrelated indicators of male dominance: male size, territory size, and territory location, and the 2 male characters that predominantly determine female choice, territories size and red coloration, may be independent predictors of male quality.

Carotenoid scarcity, synthetic pteridine pigments and the evolution of sexual coloration in guppies (Poecilia reticulata)

  • G. GretherJ. HudonJ. Endler
  • Biology, Environmental Science
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 2001
It is reported that the orange spots that male guppies (Poecilia reticulata) display to females contain red pteridine pigments (drosopterins) in addition to carotenoids, and the relationship between drosopterin production by males and carOTenoid availability in the field is examined.

Carotenoids, Immunity, and Sexual Selection: Comparing Apples and Oranges?

  • G. Lozano
  • Psychology
    The American Naturalist
  • 2001
Hill (1999) outlined several alleged inconsistencies that “have been ignored or overlooked in the growing literature pro-moting the idea of carotenoids as signals of immuno-competence,” but his arguments and supporting evidence require careful scrutiny.

Color in a Long-Lived Tropical Seabird

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