Carotenoids, Immunity, and Sexual Selection: Comparing Apples and Oranges?

@article{Lozano2001CarotenoidsIA,
  title={Carotenoids, Immunity, and Sexual Selection: Comparing Apples and Oranges?},
  author={George A. Lozano},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2001},
  volume={158},
  pages={200 - 203}
}
  • G. Lozano
  • Published 1 August 2001
  • Psychology
  • The American Naturalist
Endler (1980) suggested that in a carotenoid-poor envi-ronment, carotenoid-dependent sexual ornamentsindicateforaging ability, and hence, they can be used by femalesto gauge male quality. This idea led researchers to viewfemale mate choice from a fresh perspective, and it gaineda fair level of acceptance (Kodric-Brown 1989; Milinskiand Bakker 1990; Houde and Torio 1992; Frischknecht1993); however, many years passed before the “carotenoid-poor-environment” assumption began to be questioned(Hudon… 
Carotenoids bolster immunity during moult in a wild songbird with sexually selected plumage coloration
TLDR
This study provides experimental, seasonal support for a fundamental tenet of Lozano's ‘carotenoids trade-off’ hypothesis and adds to a growing list of animal species that benefit immunologically from ingesting higher dietary carotenoid levels.
Carotenoids, immune response and the expression of sexual ornaments in male greenfinches (Carduelis chloris)
TLDR
The idea that carotenoids are a limiting resource and that males trade ornamental colouration against immune response supports the idea thatCarotenoid availability in the diet was related to variation in antibody response to novel antigens in male greenfinches.
Carotenoids, Immunocompetence, and the Information Content of Sexual Colors: An Experimental Test
TLDR
Experimental findings suggest that carotenoid‐based color signals in birds may directly signal male health via the immunostimulatory action of ingested and circulated carOTenoid pigments.
Carotenoid trade-off between parasitic resistance and sexual display: an experimental study in the blackbird (Turdus merula)
TLDR
It is demonstrated that bill colour reflects a bird's health, and that only males with a carotenoid-rich diet are capable of coping with costs associated with parasitic infection.
Sex–specific effects of carotenoid intake on the immunological response to allografts in guppies (Poecilia reticulata)
TLDR
The sex‐specificity of carotenoid effects on allograft rejection in guppies provides indirect support for the general hypothesis that males pay an immunological cost for sexual ornamentation, and casts doubt on the idea that the benefits of carOTenoid consumption, per se, could account for the origin of the preference.
Fat soluble antioxidants in brood-rearing great tits Parus major: relations to health and appearance
TLDR
Investigation of plasma concentrations of carotenoid-based plumage coloration, sex, habitat, leukocyte hemoconcentrations and infection status with Haemoproteus blood parasites in brood-rearing great tits found results consistent with the idea that maintenance of high blood antioxidant levels might conflict with individual needs to rely on oxidative stress for fighting infections.
Do carotenoids and spleen size vary with helminth load in greylag geese
TLDR
The results support the role of integumentary carotenoid-derived coloration as an indicator of parasitism, but only for particular taxonomic groups.
Effects of nutrition on sexual ornaments and humoral immune responsiveness in adult male pheasants
TLDR
It is suggested that wattle colour may be an honest indicator of males' ability to find or assimilate dietary carotenoids, but there is no firm evidence that the mechanism maintaining honesty is a trade-off between the use of carOTenoids for ornament colouration and general immune function.
A novel body coloration phenotype in Anolis sagrei: Implications for physiology, fitness, and predation
TLDR
The effects of a novel full-bodied orange color phenotype of the brown anole, Anolis sagrei, on mate choice, physiology, and survival are tested and visual models suggest that the orange phenotype is less conspicuous to bird predators than the brown phenotype and may provide an adaptive explanation for the persistence of this trait.
Carotenoid Coloration in Greenfinches Is Individually Consistent Irrespective of Foraging Ability
TLDR
It is shown that carotenoid‐based plumage coloration can reveal circulating carotENoid levels over a very wide range of concentrations, suggesting the ample signaling potential of such a mechanism.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 42 REFERENCES
Is There an Immunological Cost to Carotenoid‐Based Ornamental Coloration?
  • G. Hill
  • Biology
    The American Naturalist
  • 1999
TLDR
It seems likely that parasite load and limited access to dietary carotenoids combine to determine color expression in many species of animals.
Carotenoids, parasites, and sexual selection
TLDR
Carotenoids are currently recognized not only as an essential part of a normal diet, but also as free radical scavengers as well as potential prophylactics against cancer and stimulants of the immune system.
Carotenoid availability and plumage coloration in a wild population of Northern Cardinals
TLDR
Changes in the size and content of the sperm storage tubules during the breeding cycle of the Zebra Finch Taeniopygia guttata and the Pied Flycatcher are studied.
Carotenoid limitation of sexual coloration along an environmental gradient in guppies
TLDR
It is shown that carotenoid availability in the wild limits the expression of sexual coloration in guppies (Poecilia reticulata), a species in which females prefer males with brighter orange-containing spots, which opens new avenues for testing signal evolution theory.
Interspecific Variation in Plasma Hue in Relation to Carotenoid Plumage Pigmentation
TLDR
To get from food in the gut to growing feathers, carotenoids must be transported in the blood, and an understanding of how birds get carOTenoids from food into developing feathers is required.
NATURAL SELECTION ON COLOR PATTERNS IN POECILIA RETICULATA
  • J. Endler
  • Biology
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1980
TLDR
Until the authors know more about how and why natural selection occurs, attempts to measure it are quixotic, and discussions of its importance are theandric.
Sex, size, and plumage redness predict house finch survival in an epidemic
TLDR
The outbreak of Mycoplasma gallisepticum affected finches of both sexes but disproportionately killed males, shifting the sex ratio from male–biased to female–biased, and supporting the idea that plumage brightness serves as an indicator of condition, as proposed by the honest advertisement model of sexual selection.
Good genes, oxidative stress and condition–dependent sexual signals
The immune and the detoxication systems of animals are characterized by allelic polymorphisms, which underlie individual differences in ability to combat assaults from pathogens and toxic compounds.
Female sticklebacks use male coloration in mate choice and hence avoid parasitized males
TLDR
It is shown that in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) the intensity of male red breeding coloration positively correlates with physical condition, and the females recognize the formerly parasitized males by the lower intensity of theirbreeding coloration.
Requirements for carotenoids in fish diets
TLDR
It is shown that astaxanthin is essential for growth and survival of fish and crawfish, and this fact is discussed in relation to the use of purified and semipurified diets in nutritional studies.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...