Carotenoid Modulation of Immune Function and Sexual Attractiveness in Zebra Finches

@article{Blount2003CarotenoidMO,
  title={Carotenoid Modulation of Immune Function and Sexual Attractiveness in Zebra Finches},
  author={Jonathan D. Blount and Neil B. Metcalfe and Tim R. Birkhead and Peter F Surai},
  journal={Science},
  year={2003},
  volume={300},
  pages={125 - 127}
}
One hypothesis for why females in many animal species frequently prefer to mate with the most elaborately ornamented males predicts that availability of carotenoid pigments is a potentially limiting factor for both ornament expression and immune function. An implicit assumption of this hypothesis is that males that can afford to produce more elaborate carotenoid-dependent displays must be healthier individuals with superior immunocompetence. However, whether variation in circulating carotenoid… 
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