Carotenemia Associated with Green Bean Ingestion

@article{Sale2004CarotenemiaAW,
  title={Carotenemia Associated with Green Bean Ingestion},
  author={Tanya A. Sale and Erik J. Stratman},
  journal={Pediatric Dermatology},
  year={2004},
  volume={21}
}
Abstract:  Carotenemia is a condition characterized by yellow discoloration of the skin and elevated blood carotene levels. Excessive and prolonged ingestion of carotene‐rich, yellow‐ or orange‐colored foods such as carrots and winter squash is the most common cause, but more rarely it may be associated with consumption of other foods as well as with hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, anorexia nervosa, liver disease, or kidney disease. Though not uncommon in children, there are few reports in… Expand
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