Caring for the spirit: lessons from working with the dying

@article{Rumbold2003CaringFT,
  title={Caring for the spirit: lessons from working with the dying},
  author={Bruce Rumbold},
  journal={Medical Journal of Australia},
  year={2003},
  volume={179}
}
  • Bruce Rumbold
  • Published 1 September 2003
  • Philosophy, Medicine, Political Science
  • Medical Journal of Australia
Spiritual care is integral to palliative care, and palliative care experience in offering spiritual care can be a resource for the emerging healthcare interest in spirituality. Spirituality is best understood in terms of the web of relationships that gives coherence to our lives, uniquely identifying each person. In palliative care, responsibility for spiritual care is shared by the whole team, with leadership given by specialist practitioners such as pastoral care workers. The palliative care… 
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