Care of the dying patient: the last hours or days of life.

@article{Ellershaw2003CareOT,
  title={Care of the dying patient: the last hours or days of life.},
  author={John Ellershaw and Chris Ward},
  journal={BMJ : British Medical Journal},
  year={2003},
  volume={326},
  pages={30 - 34}
}
Evidence based guidelines on symptom control, psychological support, and bereavement are available to facilitate a “good death” 
Caring for dying patients is not about prolonging life at all costs
All societies need to limit medical treatment for patients reaching the end of life, as per the Liverpool care pathway, says Michael Ashby, describing a Tasmanian initiative
Care at the End of Life
Using end of life care pathways for the last hours or days of life
Is safe and effective if they are used correctly
In search of a good death: Spiritual care is important for a good death
  • B. A. Clark
  • Philosophy
    BMJ : British Medical Journal
  • 2003
TLDR
The 12 principles of a good death were built on in the article by Ellershaw and Ward.
In search of a good death: Palliative care is also remit of intensivists
TLDR
The care of dying patients is reviewed and doctors adept in pharmacotherapy should manage end of life situations in a palliative care setting.
In search of a good death: What is a good death?
TLDR
Ellershaw and Ward describe how access to good palliative care should be available to all patients who are dying and disagree with the implied definition of what a good death is.
Comfort Measures: Practical Care of the Dying Cancer Patient
TLDR
A protocol for management of the dying that is clinically useful and review the existing evidence-base is presented.
End of life care in the acute hospital setting
TLDR
An update of the Liverpool care pathway does much to tackle recent criticisms and is likely to inspire confidence in the future of the system.
Why are newly qualified doctors unprepared to care for patients at the end of life?
Medical Education 2011: 45: 389–399
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