Care of the dying: what a difference an LCP makes!

@article{Ellershaw2007CareOT,
  title={Care of the dying: what a difference an LCP makes!},
  author={John Ellershaw},
  journal={Palliative Medicine},
  year={2007},
  volume={21},
  pages={365 - 368}
}
  • J. Ellershaw
  • Published 1 July 2007
  • Medicine
  • Palliative Medicine
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TLDR
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The Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient: a critical analysis of its rise, demise and legacy in England
TLDR
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The Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient: a critical analysis of its rise, demise and legacy in England.
TLDR
It exposed fault lines in the NHS, provided a platform for debates about the 'evidence' required to underpin innovations in palliative care and became a conduit of discord about 'good' or 'bad' practice in care of the dying.
The Rotterdam Elderly Pain Observation Scale (REPOS) is reliable and valid for non-communicative end-of-life patients
TLDR
This study demonstrates that the REPOS has promising psychometric properties for pain assessment in non-communicative end-of-life patients and may be of additional value to relieve suffering, including pain, in palliative care.
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