Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Prone Position: A Simplified Method for Outpatients

@article{Wei2004CardiopulmonaryRI,
  title={Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Prone Position: A Simplified Method for Outpatients},
  author={Jeng Wei and D Y Tung and Sung-How Sue and Shing‐Van Wu and Y. C. Chuang and Chung-Yi Chang},
  journal={Journal of the Chinese Medical Association},
  year={2004},
  volume={69},
  pages={202–206}
}
Background: The efficacy of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is vital for saving lives of victims with sudden cardiac arrest. In 1960, Kuowenhoven and colleagues proposed the method that has become standard for CPR. Despite vast input of resources for public education and training of this procedure, its success rate outside hospitals remains poor to dismal. During CPR, restoration of respiration is as important as circulation. But opening the airway and giving effective mouth‐to‐mouth… Expand
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Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in prone position: a simplified method for outpatients.
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This study revealed that prone CPR provides good respiratory and circulatory support at the same time and it may be a good alternative way for bystanders to perform CPR in public surroundings. Expand
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The method of prone CPR merits further consideration based on a number of subsequent supporting studies and case reports, which suggest it may represent a superior alternative to traditional CPR. Expand
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A BSTRACT Background The use of automated external defibrillators by persons other than paramedics and emergency medical technicians is advocated by the American Heart Association and otherExpand
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TLDR
To improve survival rates after cardiac arrest ambulance response times must be reduced and the frequency of bystander-initiated CPR increased, once these changes are in place a beneficial effect from advanced manoeuvres such as prehospital defibrillation may be seen. Expand
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TLDR
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